Carren's Pitch

Life by Design

Los Angeles isn't just about large mansions and out of this world features, it's also about spaces that are thoughtfully decorated and loved such as Tamra Fago's home in Highland Park. 

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Alice Short
Published: 3 April 2015, Los Angeles Times

Artist Tamra Fago stands in the front doorway of her 900-square foot home in the Garvanza neighborhood near downtown L.A. by Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times.
Living large in a small space is not only possible, it can also be beautiful — if Tamra Fago's 900-square-foot home in the Garvanza neighborhood near downtown L.A. is any indication. Though cozy, the artist's space is filled with all sorts of pieces that combine to create a charming whole.

Fago, a former graphic designer and photo stylist with more than 30 years of experience designing clothing and accessories, gravitated to her current lodgings after a stint in Silver Lake. "It was just getting too expensive," she says. Now her early 1900s, white board and batten two-story home offers beauty, community and cost-efficiency. [read more]

Brad isn't just about making a profit, he's also about preserving the small pieces of architectural history that usually get swept away. Here's a quick sidebar about his work along with the feature piece on Tamra's home

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Alice Short
Published 03 April 2015, Los Angeles Times

Bank executive Brad Chambers didn't set out to be a preservationist, but his financial background, coupled with a love for small architectural structures, naturally led him down that path.

Over almost two decades, Chambers has purchased, restored and rented out nine historic homes within the Garvanza neighborhood — each around1,500 square feet or less — and others outside of the neighborhood.

"Those houses are the ones that are most at risk," Chambers says. "It's very easy to justify tearing them down because [they're] too small for families and too expensive for investors, who could make more money building multi-family homes on the same land." [read more]

4/02/2015

Future States

Posted by Carren Jao Pineda |

There are those who look at the world a little differently and Bernhard Willhelm is one of those. His view of fashion isn't stuck in the process of making and manufacturing, his work is also a commentary. I got a little peek for Surface's March issue. Read on :)

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Spencer Bailey
Published: March 2015, Surface

3/18/2015

A spectrum of colours opens at Blum & Poe

Posted by Carren Jao Pineda |

Sometimes, the simplest of things are the most difficult to make. Theodora Allen's work is like that. At the surface, it is elegant, spare and simple, but look beneath into her process, and you'll find an amazing amount of patience and skill involved. 

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Sam Rogers
Published: 11 March 2015, Wallpaper*

Plot, No.3, 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles. via Wallpaper.
Thirty-year-old artist Theodora Allen’s work can best be compared to a prism of colour, subtly shifting from one tone to another - an understated rainbow viewed through a glass of water. Rather than scream for attention, Allen’s work - on view until 18 April at L.A.’s Blum & Poe - captivates viewers with its nuance.

'It’s an evolved thinness,' explains Allen, 'I applied oil paint on linen and then removed layers before it dries.' The process removes the actual pigment, yet absorbs the colour into the canvas.

Instead of obliterating all traces of her hand, Allen celebrates it, sidesteps and successes alike. Ghost images appear over the final image like layered veils, playing peek-a-boo with the eye. [read more]

The city is an amazing resource if one has eyes to notice. Nance Klehm is one of those people. She's taking people on a tour of the city as a food source. 

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Alice Short
Published: 13 Feb 2015, Los Angeles Times

Horticulturist Nance Klehm will lead a walkabout to discuss wild edibles in Los Angeles. (Jason Creps)

A fifth-generation horticulturalist, Nance Klehm has always been attuned to the great outdoors. "I grew up on 500 acres of rural northwest Illinois. We had an orientation to land, animals and plants as part of our world. It's never been something I've been separated from," says Klehm, who is also an urban forager and self-styled "radical ecologist." Over the years, she's led foraging tours around the world, and on Feb. 22, with the support of design shop Otherwild and the feminist art practice Women's Center for Creative Work, she will lead an urban walkabout designed to help Angelenos identify edible plants and learn about their botanical histories. [read more]

I didn't think it would happen, but I developed a serious design crush on British designer Thomas Heatherwick. The curiosity and process showcased in his exhibition is a great place to get an appreciation of his work. 

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Anna Fixsen
Published: 24 Feb 2015, Architectural Record

Heatherwick's UK Pavilion. Photo © Iwan Baan.

Just in time for Chinese New Year, the Hammer Museum made two resolutions of sorts, unveiling an architectural addition, and a traveling exhibition.

Thursday, the Los Angeles museum inaugurated the John V. Tunney Bridge, a sweeping concrete pedestrian bridge by local architect Michael Maltzan that stitches together the museum’s second floor east and west galleries.

The structure forms a dramatic backdrop to an equally thrilling survey exhibition chronicling the work of London-based design and architecture firm Heatherwick Studio. Organized by the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas and curated by Brooke Hodge, deputy director of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio dares viewers to let logic guide them to creative solutions to even the most pedestrian of problems. [read more]

LA is an amazing place that attracts all kinds of people, and animals too, apparently. Here, I write about a strange neighbor, the endangered green sea turtle making their home in Los Angeles. 

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Text by: Carren Jao
Edited by: Yosuke Kitazawa
Published: 26 Feb 2015, KCET

Turtle swimming close to shore | Photo: Hugh Ryono
Crush may have almost stolen the show in "Finding Nemo," and with good reason. Green sea turtles are true nomads of the water, able to make a home in waterways around the world, including -- surprisingly -- the most urban of places like the San Gabriel River in Long Beach. [read more]

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