Carren's Pitch

Life by Design

5/05/2018

Narrated Slideshows of La Raza Photographers

Posted by Carren Jao Pineda |

One of the cool things about my work is experimenting with new kinds of contents. This one required audio editing, finding great photos and putting it all together. It took many hours, but the results were well worth it. In the end, we have an archive of precious, historically important memories from the Chicano movement. 

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Raul Ruiz, Manuel Barrera, Jr., Patricia Borjon of La Raza | Luis Garza, La Raza photograph collection. Courtesy of UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
The Chicano Movement wasn't just one segment of the population. It encompassed people of all ages. See their photos and hear photographer Devra Weber speak about them.

Many of the issues that were prevalent in the 1960s and 70s are still present in today's times. Hear how La Raza photorapher Gil Lopez's thoughts on continuing the struggle today.

Police surveillance and infiltration on the youth activists was prevalent. But they weren't the only ones watching, so were the activists. Hear Patricia Borjon Lopez's take on these police activities.

During the turbulence of the 60s and 70s, 35 people were arrested for sitting in a Board of Education meeting. But no trial ever came to being. Hear Raul Ruiz talk about those fateful arrests.

'La Raza,' the community newspaper turned magazine, drew an eclectic mix of people from all walks of life. Hear La Raza photographer Luis Garza talk about his colleagues.

In the 1960s and 70s, photojournalism was used as a technique for organizing and to fight negative streotypes of the Chicano in the media.

The 60s and 70s was a time of many changes and upheavals. Amid all this, the Chicanos saw a way to make a difference. Hear Moctesuma Esparza's thoughts on the turbulent time.

La Raza, the community newspaper-turned-magazine, may have played an important role during the 60s and 70s, but it's legacy is even more important today, for a young generation that have to learn their personal histories.

As part of La Raza magazine, photographer Maria Marquez Sanchez had to choose between being part of the action and ensuring that history wouldn't forget their deeds.

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